Photography Tips for Getting From Good to Great

Being a good photographer and being a great one, are quite far apart in the results you get, but getting from good to great can often be simply a case of knowing a few little tips and tricks that have a massive impact on the results you get. I’m going to share with you, a few of the tricks and tips that can transform your results from okay, or even good, to exceptional.

First of all study the work of professional photographers – they’ve studied their art and whilst some of their work may not match the dizzy heights of such luminaries as Ansel Adams, they do illustrate an extremely high level of photography skills.  For example, the work of London Wedding Photographer David Bell is just outstanding (Visit his site at www.bellissimaphoto.co.uk ).  Weddings can be pretty boring subjects to photograph (IMHO), but David turns the ordinary into extraordinary.

So having inspired you a little, let’s talk tips.  One of the most underrated aspects of photography is aperture. The aperture is the name of the opening inside your lens which lets the light into the sensor. Naturally, the wider that opening, the more light allowed through, and the narrower the opening, the less light allowed in. This is the size of the aperture. Adjusting the aperture will dramatically affect your results.

The size of aperture is regulated by the control on the lens barrel, and the aperture is measured in f-stops. The smaller the number, the wider the opening.

Experiment with your aperture settings to familiarise yourself with the effects. Take care not to use a wider aperture in order to compensate for insufficient lighting because apart from increasing the light that is let into the sensor, a wider aperture also changes the percentage of the image that stays in focus.
The best time for using wider apertures is when taking portrait shots. The reason for this is, when you widen the aperture, the camera is focusing fully on the subject you have in focus. It becomes super-clear while the background will be blurred.

If a wide aperture blurs the background in order to pull the subject into full, clear focus, a narrow aperture will be better for landscapes, where you want the whole scene to be clear and in focus, including distant trees and flowers.

Another tip is to make sure you have the right filter. You could have a selection of filters, but if you’re only able to have one, it’s best to choose a circular polariser. This filter is the best option for beginners, and it will transform your photography results with vibrant tones and accentuating contrast. Editing a photo to get the effect of this filter is never as successful as using the filter in the first place.

Taking the time and putting in the effort to choose the right equipment for you, will make your journey to great photographer effortless.

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